Shades

African Mahogany

Sapwood is creamy white or yellowish color. When freshly sawn the heartwood is a light pinkish-brown color, that deepens to a reddish-brown and sometimes has a purple hue.
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Afrormosia

Sapwood is narrow and golden light brown in color and clearly demarcated from the orange-brown heartwood. The heartwood tends to be lightly streaked and turns a brownish-yellow with exposure to light and air.
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Andiroba

Sapwood is a light pink or pale brown color, not always demarcated from the heartwood. Heartwood is a light salmon to reddish brown, darkening with age to a medium to dark brown. Quarter sawn surfaces exhibit a ribbon-like appearance similar to Sapele.
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Black Limba

Heartwood is a light yellowish to golden brown, sometimes with grey to nearly black streaks and veins. Wood with this darker figuring is referred to as Black Limba, while plain unfigured wood is called White Limba. Sapwood is a pale greyish to yellowish brown, not clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Color tends to darken with age.
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Bloodwood

Bright vivid red. Color can darken to brownish red over time with exposure to light and air.
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Bocote

Ranges from tan to golden brown to pale golden yellow, with irregular brown streaks. Heartwood is sharply demarcated from the greyish or yellowish sapwood. With age, the heartwood can be tobacco colored or dark brown with almost black streaks.
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Brazilian Cherry / Jatoba

Sapwood can be wide and is either white or pink and sometimes gray. Heartwood varies from salmon red to orange brown which darkens to a red brown when exposed to sun.
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Brazilian Ebony / Ironwood

Wide range of colors and figures, from solid with even color, to streaked and marble-like figure. Heartwood ranges from olive brown to near black and can have lighter or darker markings that are sharply separated from the sapwood, which is lighter and yellow in appearance. When first cut, the colors and figure are bright and bold. Once exposed to air and light, the brightness of the wood diminishes and takes on a darker, more subtle appearance.
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Bubinga

Sapwood is very pale with clear demarcations. Heartwood can be a variety of colors, including pink, vivid red or red-brown with purple veining. With exposure, veining becomes less conspicuous and deep colors fade to medium brown with a reddish tint.
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Cocobolo

Heartwood contains many colors and can range from yellow, orange to a reddish-brown with dark brown to black streaks throughout. Sapwood is a whitish color and is not frequently used for commercial purposes.
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Cumaru

Sapwood is a yellowish-brown and is distinct from the heartwood, which is a reddish-brown to purple-hued brown. Exposure to light makes the overall color become more uniform.
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Ebony

Only the black or brown heartwood is used commercially.
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Granadillo

Heartwood varies somewhat in color and can be found in red, black and brown variations, sometimes with mottling and streaks. Sapwood is very pale, almost white.
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Ironwood / Brazilian Ebony

Wide range of colors and figures, from solid with even color, to streaked and marble-like figure. Heartwood ranges from olive brown to near black and can have lighter or darker markings that are sharply separated from the sapwood, which is lighter and yellow in appearance. When first cut, the colors and figure are bright and bold. Once exposed to air and light, the brightness of the wood diminishes and takes on a darker, more subtle appearance.
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Jatoba / Brazilian Cherry

Sapwood can be wide and is either white or pink and sometimes gray. Heartwood varies from salmon red to orange brown which darkens to a red brown when exposed to sun.
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Kingwood

Heartwood is a dark purplish or reddish brown with darker black streaks. Sapwood is a pale yellow.
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Mahogany

Sapwood is yellowish-white to pale brown, with heartwood that varies from medium to deep red-brown, and in some heavier woods, a deep, rich red.
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Okoume

Heartwood is salmon pink to pale pinkish-brown or reddish-brown. It darkens with exposure to light to a mahogany-like color, and is relatively demarcated from the white to pale grey sapwood.
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Padauk

Vividly colored heartwood, that when freshly cut appears deep red. After exposure, it turns to a deep purple-brown with red streaks. The distinct sapwood ranges in color from white to yellowish-brown.
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Peruvian Walnut

Deep, rich, dark chocolate brown heartwood with a blackish stripe that creates a desirable figure. It can sometimes have a purplish hue, and may also contain streaks of lighter-colored wood mixed throughout the heartwood—these streaks can sometimes be extensive and result in a high degree of waste.
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Purpleheart

Off-white sapwood is sharply demarcated from the heartwood. When freshly cut the heartwood of Purpleheart is a  dull grayish/purplish brown. Upon exposure the wood becomes a deeper eggplant purple. With further age and exposure to UV light, the wood becomes a dark brown with a hint of purple.
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Rosewood

Yellow sapwood with an appearance distinctly different from the heartwood. The pinkish-brown to purple-brown tones of the heartwood appear in alternating dark and light streaks with black markings, creating a very attractive figure.
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Santos Mahogany

White sapwood is sharply demarcated from the heartwood. Heartwood offers a wide range of colors from light orange-brown tones to a dark reddish-brown in color.
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Sapele

Heartwood is medium to dark-reddish brown with a medium texture, high-luster, pale yellow sapwood.
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Teak

Heartwood is almost always a rich golden brown in color, but may also vary from rich brown to a deep, chocolate brown with very dark markings. The sapwood is white to pale yellow in color, and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood.
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Walnut

Sapwood is creamy white, while the heartwood is light to dark chocolate brown, occasionally with a purplish cast and darker streaks. Walnut is usually supplied steamed to darken sapwood.
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Zebrawood

The sapwood is whitish in color, and virtually without feature. The heartwood is straw-like in color and distinctively marked with narrow veining or “streaks” of color ranging from dark brown to almost black.
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